Carbon Taxes in Singapore: Causes and Consequences

Dr. Tilak K. Doshi, Managing Consultant, Muse, Stancil & Co. (Asia)

Venue : Stamford American Auditorium (AmCham Office, 1 Scotts Rd, #23-03 Shaw Centre)

Date : July 13, 2017

Time : 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Price : $0.00

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Description

Hosted by the Energy Committee


This presentation looks at Singapore's proposed carbon tax under three broad policy criteria of environmental effectiveness, distributional equity and economic efficiency. It briefly discusses the differences between carbon taxes and cap-and-trade schemes. Finally, it focuses on the issues of a "level playing field" in the case of Singapore's role as Asia's oil refining and petrochemicals hub.  



About the Speaker

 

Dr. Tilak K. Doshi

Managing Consultant

Muse, Stancil & Co. (Asia)

 

Dr. Tilak K. Doshi is Managing Consultant with Muse, Stancil & Co. (Asia). Dr. Doshi is an industry expert with over 25 years of international work experience in leading oil and gas companies.


His previous appointments include Chief Economist, Energy Studies Institution, National University of Singapore; Executive Director for Energy, Dubai Multi Commodities Centre; Specialist Consultant, Saudi Aramco (Dhahran, Saudi Arabia); Chief Asia Economist, Unocal Corporation (Singapore); Director for Economic and Industry Analysis, Atlantic Richfield Corporation (ARCO, Los Angeles, U.S.).


Dr. Doshi is the author of many articles and three books on energy economics, the most recent of which was “Singapore Chronicles: Energy” (Straits Times Press, 2016). He received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Hawaii on a scholarship provided by the East-West Centre. He was one of two candidates which were granted the 1984 Robert S. McNamara Research Fellow award by World Bank, Washington, D.C., and he received a Distinction for MA in Economics by Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand in 1982.

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