How Diversity in Corporations Contributes to More Fair Societies

Dr. Yolanda T. Moses, Professor of Anthropology and Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Excellence, University of California; and William Gipson, Chief Diversity & R&D Senior Vice President, Asia Innovation Centers, Procter & Gamble

Venue : Stamford American Auditorium (AmCham Office, 1 Scotts Rd, #23-03 Shaw Centre)

Date : February 22, 2017

Time : 7:45 AM - 9:15 AM

Price : $0.00

Description

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AmCham and the U.S. Embassy cordially invite you to our annual Black History Month event highlighting the importance and value of diversity in our companies and societies.  In an era where rising inequality is in the global spotlight, this year's program will focus on how diversity in corporations contributes to more fair societies.

The guest speaker is Dr. Yolanda T. Moses, hosted by William Gipson
Chief Diversity & R&D Senior Vice President, Asia Innovation Centers at Procter & Gamble.

Dr. Moses is Professor of Anthropology and most recently Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Excellence at the University of California, Riverside.  Dr. Moses’ research focuses on the broad question of the origins and sustainability of social inequality systems and practices in complex societies.  Dr. Moses is currently a Fulbright Distinguished Chair at the University of Sydney.


Among her other achievements is serving as co-founder and member of the Steering Committee of the University of California-wide research project, “University of California Center For New Racial Studies).” The mission of the Center is to support innovation in UC-based race/racism research and teaching and to encourage interdisciplinary and collaborative work focused on advancing social/racial justice in an era of changing racial dynamics and persistent racial/ethnic conflict and inequality.

We hope you will be able to attend this timely and important discussion. 


About the Speaker:

Dr. Yolanda T. Moses

Currently serves as Professor of Anthropology and most recently as Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity and Excellence at the University of California, Riverside.
  Dr. Moses’ research focuses on the broad question of the origins and sustainability of social inequality systems and practices in complex societies through the use of comparative ethnographic and survey methods.  She has explored gender and class disparities in the Caribbean, East Africa and in the United States.  More recently, her research has focused on issues of diversity and change in universities and colleges in the United States, India, Europe and South Africa.

Moses served as President of the American Anthropological Association (1995-97), Chair of the Board of the American Association of Colleges and Universities (2000), Past President of City University of New York/ The City College (1993-1999), and President of the American Association for Higher Education (2000-2003). She was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Ford Foundation from 1996 to 2008. She is a proud product of public higher education in California.

She has been involved
   on the steering groups of several   U.S. national higher education projects with the National Council for Research on Women, Campus Women Lead and The Women of Color Research Collective.  In addition, she was   Chair of the National Advisory Board of a multi-year national public education project  ( 2003-2016) sponsored by the American Anthropological Association and funded by NSF and the Ford Foundation on Race and Human Variation. The goal of the project was to change the way the nation understood and talked about the meaning and consequences of “race” in the United States. She was Co-PI on a Ford Foundation grant that sponsored phase two of that work.

She just finished her stint as the PI on an NSF ADVANCE Grant, (2011 to 2016) to advance the role of women faculty in the STEM Fields, both in hiring and in retention; and she was recently PI on an National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Grant (2011-12) to create a national educational network for educators to develop a bio-cultural approach to the teaching of race in high school and in undergraduate social science and biology classes.

At the University of California, she served as co-founder and on the Steering Committee of the UC wide research project, “UCCNRS (University of California Center For New Racial Studies).” The mission of the Center is to support innovation in UC-based race/racism research and teaching and to encourage interdisciplinary and collaborative work focused on advancing social/racial justice in an era of changing racial dynamics and persistent racial/ethnic conflict and inequality.

She is the co-author also with Carol Mukhopadhyay and Rosemary Henze, Professors at CSU San Jose of the book: How Real is Race: A Sourcebook on Race, Culture and Biology (2007) Rowman and Littlefield; (2014) Altamira Press. She is also co-author along with Alan Goodman and Joseph Jones,of the book, Race: are we so Different? Published by Wiley-Blackwell (2012).

Moses was a national consultant to the American Council on Education’s Project, on linking International and Diversity Issues, and to the recent publication, At Home in the World: Bridging the Gap between Internationalization and Multicultural Education (2007, 2010). She is currently a faculty member in the Salzburg Seminar‘s ISP Global Citizenship
   Program in Salzburg, Austria, and in the newly formed Global Citizenship Program in Potsdam, Germany. She continues as faculty member in the on-going Mellon Fellows Program on Global Citizenship that links Historically Black Colleges and Universities with Appalachia Colleges and Universities. In 2009, she was named an AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science) Fellow. And in 2016 she was presented the Franz Boas Lifetime Achievement Award for service and enlightenment to the field of anthropology by the American Anthropology Association.

Moses faculty positions
  have included a position as Professor of Anthropology at the City University of New York Graduate University (1993-2000); a senior visiting research appointment at George Washington University in Washington D. C. (2000 to 2003), a Distinguished Visiting Professor position at the Claremont Graduate University (2003); and visiting lectureships  at the University of Melbourne ( 2014 and 2016).

William P. Gipson
Chief Diversity Officer
Senior Vice President, Research and Development, Asia Innovation
Procter and Gamble

Chief Diversity Officer and Senior Vice President of Research and Development, Asia Innovation, William Gipson is leading P&G’s global diversity and inclusion strategy to ensure Everyone is Valued, Everyone is Included and Everyone is Able to Perform at Their PeakTM. William also leads Innovation Capability across our technical centers in Asia.

With 30 years at P&G, William has grown his career with increasing levels of responsibility, including assignments in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and Caracas, Venezuela, assuming overall responsibility for Pampers R&D Latin America and led R&D innovation for brands like ThermaCare, Meta, Vicks, Bounty, Charmin, Duracell, Pantene and Head & Shoulders.

William is a graduate of the University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa with a degree in Chemical Engineering. Prior to obtaining his engineering degree, William served in the US Air Force. His external affiliations include the Cincinnati Scholarship Foundation, Board Member on the National Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME), Member on the Cincinnati Business Committee Education Task Force, Board and Committee Member on the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) and Member of the Executive Leadership Council. He is a native of Montgomery, Alabama, and currently lives in Singapore with his wife.

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